Sunday, January 14, 2018

Yorkshire Dales and a Castle




Wouldn't it be wonderful to visit the Yorkshire Dales?  Yes, we thought so too, so let's travel along another beautiful road in England and venture to a very beautiful area.  Even though we are staying in the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales are just next door.  This beautiful area is full of river valleys and hills.  It is in the northern section of England in the Pennines.  The U and V shaped valleys were formed by the ice age.  Dry stone walls dot the bucolic sheep and cattle pastures.


We have a beautiful day to explore this lovely area.  Don't worry about snow as it's still September and it won't come for a couple months now!  


I must admit I have taken so many photos it is difficult to not post them all!  I'm sure I would lose you, so I will try very hard not to post too many.  


We are traveling along the roads on our way to a very special castle.  It's quite ancient and most of it is in ruins, but very interesting. 


The Yorkshire Dales are lush and green as is most of England.  The frequent rain rewards us with beautiful sights!




The underlying rock is limestone and shale.  I love seeing the many walls constructed so long ago.



As lovely as the purple loosestrife is, it's an invasive plant in the US and I assume it is in England as well.  We saw quite a bit of it all over.  This invasive plant was brought over to North America in the ballasts of ships in the 1800's.  The problem is the plant can degrade the wetlands and mess with the natural habitat that lives there.



Riding along we are treated to one lovely sight after the other.


Garsdale Head Viaduct



There are many beautiful stone bridges and viaducts as we are traveling along the country roads.  Some are ancient, but still in use.  



Around every bend there are surprises.



Here is our first glimpse of Castle Bolton!  There she stands proudly as she has for over 600 years.  She was the home of Sir Richard Le Scroupe.  He was the Lord Treasurer and Lord Chancellor to Richard II.  Historians suggest he was "the perfect and gentle knight" described in Chaucer's, Canterbury Tales.   Castle Bolton has a fascinating history.  Come along and we'll go inside.






This is the view from the castle car park!  Can you believe its beauty?



Saint Oswald Church is right next to Castle Bolton.



The church dates back to the 14th century with a congregation still today. 



Walking into the castle entrance that takes you through a tearoom, I spy the largest bag of tea I've ever seen!



It's quite chilly in this old castle, so I can just imagine there are many takers for tea here today!

After checking in we receive a map and begin to explore the ruins of Castle Bolton.  As you can tell a castle is really a small city into itself.  We learn that the castle would have been more fine than any 21st century hotel.



The wind is whipping around all of the old ruins, so we'll explore all bundled in our coats.

Castle Bolton was in its heyday until 1536 when it was fired by King Henry VIII because he disapproved of Sir John, 8th Baron Scropes for his non support during the Pilgrimage of Grace.  Then one hundred years later it suffered an attack by Parliamentarian forces for 6 months during the Civil War.  The Castle was "slighted" (meaning a partial destruction) by  Cromwell's men in 1647 after being held by parliament for two years. In 1761 the North East Tower collapsed during a storm.  It was not until the turn of the 21st century that conservation work was completed and allowed visitors to Castle Bolton. 

Going inside we visit an interesting hall that has dried flowers and herbs used for what ails may befall you.





Stepping into the center we see the ancient walls of the castle.



  

You can see that this Castle was enormous.







Let's climb the tower and see some of the bed chambers.



On the way we pass through many great halls.







On the way there are many amazing views from the castle.



Mary Queen of Scots stayed in this bed chamber during her imprisonment after the Battle of Langside was lost.  She was moved here by Elizabeth I.  She brought along with her many servants.  Some of them stayed here at the castle and some in the surrounding area.




  She was allowed to go about the grounds and hunt.  She studied English as she spoke French and Scots (a variety of English) when she came to Castle Bolton. 









You can view the lovely gardens that surround the castle.  It is believed that Castle Bolton did not have a moat.






Driving along the lane, leaving Castle Bolton, we see the most interesting carving of a dragon.  How fitting for our trip to this Medieval Castle!




It was carved by chainsaw by a local artist, Andris Bergs,   from a fallen ash tree.  Notice the dragon appears to have finished off a brave knight!













42 comments:

  1. What tremendous beauty! I must say the countryside is gorgeous and so dreamy! It reminds me of Ireland...I went there in the summer of 2016 and then again last February, and it looks a lot like the countryside you shared here. Endless rolling hills, green patchwork and sheep roaming up and down the hills. Last winter when we were there, it was during lambing season, and so we saw many baby lambs frolicking around with their mamas.

    One thing we noticed in Ireland was that the roads are very, very narrow. Often when not on the motorway, we would be driving down a country road and would come across another car coming the opposite direction. One car would have to pull off to let the other pass. Did you find that to be the case in England? And another delightful little thing was that everyone waves to one another whilst driving in Ireland...we quickly caught onto that and found ourselves waving, too!

    This was a delightful post, and a lovely little taste of England! That is the next country we want to visit...hopefully next year {{smiles}}

    Enjoy your weekend!
    ~Elizabeth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elizabeth, Ireland is on our bucket list. Seeing the baby lambs must have been delightful. Yes, we went on a lot of one track roads in Devon and Cornwall. Even went on a very scary one in the Lake District! They are just the scariest things! Yes, most folks in England waved as well on the small roads. Very friendly and helpful when we needed it. I think you would love England. Great Britain has captured our hearts! It's all so pastoral and peaceful. Have a lovely evening. ♥

      Delete
  2. Wonderful pictures, Martha Ellen. This area is so green and pretty. The castle is Grand with its charming old rooms. The gardens are so lovely. I like the picture of your husband in front of the church. And I think I would want to take home some of that tea. : )

    ~Sheri

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sheri, England is so lush and green. You should be able to find Yorkshire Tea in your grocery. I see it everywhere in my town. It's a strong, bold tea that I enjoy very much. ♥

      Delete
  3. Is it any wonder that Blake penned the words "in England's green and pleasant land"?
    I look at those walls and think how they are as bleak as they are strong and sturdy. I wonder if they put any sort of rendering on them back in their day? Churches were brightly painted, as we know, so did they do the same wiht castle interiors? Maybe it's why tapestries were so popular to break all that grey stonework.
    I love that four poster bed!
    Right now, I am drinking a mug of hot Yorkshire tea ~ the very same brand, which I find to be one of the better tea bag brands!
    ~~~Deb in Wales xoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deb, I think the tapestries did brighten the walls as well as insulate them against the cold winds. The fact so many castles still stand today surely is a testament to their fine building practices.
      I read somewhere that the canopied bed in Mary Queen of Scots bed chamber was haunted! No one has been able to sleep in it all night---maybe so, maybe not!
      Blake's Jeruselum poem is perfect!
      Enjoy your Yorkshire tea. I'm off to brew a pot of Earl Grey. ♥

      Delete
  4. You took us on a wonderful tour, it was a joy to be reminded of such beauty. It has been a while since we have toured the Yorkshire dales but we have fond memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Yorkshire Dales were so lovely. I'm so glad we included them on our trip! ♥

      Delete
  5. Wow...what a totally depressing bedroom! haha...bet that bed is hard too. Great pics. I want to go somewhere....but my somewhere will probably just consist of a day trip here and there when its not so darn cold. My travel today was out in the backyard to photograph some snow pics (of the snow that is left)....haha. I have a friend in NJ and one in OH I hope to visit this yr. No plans to go as far as you did or to see the things you did...so thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Even though castles can look somewhat dark to us, believe me this is where the upper crust lived! Can you imagine where the common folk lived? It is interesting to us to see how folks lived so long ago. ♥

      Delete
  6. Such a lovely ride there you had. I never get tired of seeing stone walls. The castle tour is amazing. It seemed surprising to see it so intact seeing the interior rooms with furniture and linens when some of it looks like ruins! Thanks for the tour! Such rich and old history!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Even though parts of the castle is in ruins, other portions are still in wonderful condition due to conservation work. The whole area is so pastoral and full of unbelievable beauty. ♥

      Delete
  7. When we go to England I think what I'll love besides the landscape and vistas are those stone walls! Thanks for the tour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The stone walls of Great Britain add another layer of loveliness to the beauty of their lush land. Quite extraordinary! ♥

      Delete
  8. This is so amazing. Seeing the gorgeous countryside makes me want to get out there and walk. These villages and castles that you’ve been sharing are amazing and I’m enjoying the history that I’m lerning along the way. The castle is a little sad looking but it’s good to know there are preservation steps in place for it. The gardens are wonderful- looks like a bunch of Russian sage planted in the beds. You two sure went on a fantastic vacation!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Liz, there are many ancient walks throughout Great Britain that many folks enjoy. The gardens around most of the sites we visited would make you swoon! We loved seeing the ancient castles and homes that still stand in England and Scotland. ♥

      Delete
  9. Loving James Herriot books as I do, I have been charmed by this scenery! Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, Vee, this is Herriot countryside. It's lovely. ♥

      Delete
  10. What a beautiful sights with lush green. Love the Castle, and its history.. that bedchamber fascinates me a lot.. I always love to imagine the life at that time..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, Krishna. Imagining what life was like and walking the same halls is humbling. ♥

      Delete
  11. I am very much enjoying these photos and the history you are sharing with us. I hope to one day get to visit England myself and see all the amazing sites and all it has to offer. Looking forward to seeing more. Have a great afternoon!

    Blessings,
    Jill

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jill. I think you would really enjoy visiting Great Britain. Going back to England was a dream come true for us! ♥

      Delete
  12. This looks absolutely amazing! What an incredible experience! So cool that you documented this trip with so many great photos. :)

    Madison | Breakfast at Madison’s

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. England is a gorgeous country, Madison. The countryside is so peaceful and lovely. ♥

      Delete
  13. So many great shots of this beauty. Beautiful old stone and great shot of your husband in front of the castle as it gives an idea how huge this place is. The country side is so lovely to look at over and over with those rolling hills.
    Loose strife is a good name for that plant. It's seeds blow every where.
    betsy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Betsy. I don't have a problem with loosestrife, but I know some areas are just riddled with its existence. The Yorkshire Dales captured our attention. I'll be sharing more in the weeks to come. ♥

      Delete
  14. What a fascinating post! You must have to pay very close attention to take it all in! No apologies about the number of photos. They are integral to the travelogue!

    Our current history studies are in the 1600s, so I read the historical notes with great interest, and I will share this post with Bekah too. Such a castle is an amazing piece of architecture . . . and the scenery is pretty amazing as well!

    1200 tea bags?!! :)

    Thanks for sharing your adventures with us, Martha Ellen! You celebrated your 50th wedding anniversary with the trip of a lifetime!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheryl, thank you for your kind remarks. This trip was indeed a trip of a lifetime- One that we'll always remember. We both love history and enjoyed learning more about Britain's ancient background. Reading about these events is one thing, but walking in the same spaces was thrilling for us. ♥

      Delete
  15. What a wonderful experience you and your dh had, I have always wanted to visit England, thank you for this glimpse of such a beautiful country! I would have so many questions about their lifestyles! I am also fascinated with English gardens.
    Thank you for visiting and for your sweet comment.
    Blessings,
    Sue

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sue. History teaches us many lessons. We sometimes romanticize certain eras. I know life was quite difficult for the folks that lived in and especially around Castle Bolton.
      Have a wonderful day! ♥

      Delete
  16. Oh, Martha Ellen! Heartfelt thanks for inviting us along on your visit to the Yorkshire Dales! You are the perfect tour guide! I've been gazing at each photo, hoping to soak it all in. (There could never be too many photo memories!) The ancient stone walls and bridges stand so proudly amidst the verdant hills and valleys. Bolton Castle looks absolutely fascinating. I adore your photo peeking through the leaded glass window, looking over the green fields below. I love to take those kind of photos, too. They feel like the perfect blend of the past and present for all who are fortunate to visit this ancient castle! I'm slowly catching up on your travels, dear one. I'm saving each travel post in a special England folder. Maybe someday...
    Huge hugs! ♡

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Dawn, we were thrilled to visit the Yorkshire Dales on this trip! England just continued to thrill our souls with beauty and history. Castle Bolton was our first stop and I will be sharing more about the area as time permits.
      I'm so happy to have you come along with us. ♥

      Delete
  17. Wonderful post Martha Ellen, love the pretty countryside as well as the old buildings and castles. So much history. My husband loves England. I love looking at your wonderful photos. It is like I am there with you. Blessings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Linda. I have so many photos that I'm continuing to go through. We were celebrating our 50th anniversary. ♥

      Delete
  18. Amazing shots. I love to spend time on those places:)

    ReplyDelete
  19. How lovely! I think this is where The Secret Garden, my favorite book growing up, takes place.
    Amalia
    xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd forgotten that, Amalia. Yes, it did take place in Yorkshire! I love that book as well. Have a great day. xo ♥

      Delete
  20. Thank you for the tour! It's been far too long since I've seen the Dales! Love the dry stone walls, the sheep and, of course, the green! Love your photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jean. I have a few more days worth of photos in Yorkshire. We're so glad we included this area in our itinerary. We had been to the York Minster a couple of years ago, but did not view the Dales as intently as this time. ♥

      Delete
  21. Fabulous photographs showing this area at its best.
    I haven't been in that part of the UK for a good many years and seeing these photographs I feel I should try and visit during 2018!

    Yorkshire Tea is my favourite everyday tea ... in fact I think I will go and make a nice cup now!

    My good wishes

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Jan, I do hope you go to the Dales this year. It's such a beautiful, interesting area.
      Enjoy your tea. I'm having Earl Grey as I write to you! ♥

      Delete

Your comments will show after moderation. Thank you. ♥