Monday, July 30, 2018

Townend and Troutbeck Valley




Today I'd like to take you to Troutbeck Valley in the Lake District.  When we traveled to England in 2015 we visited this special spot and wanted to return on our Golden Anniversary trip in the fall of 2017.  The valley is home to many special farms and lovely scenic views and one special farmhouse of the Brownes called Townend.  If you want to read about our visit then you can go Here.  


The weather was very similar this visit as was our weather last visit.  The incredible silence in this area is noteworthy.


As we take our turn we are transported to a special place in time.  We are early and have to wait for the car park gate to open.  





The views are just spectacular as we drink in the beauty of the morning. 



I decided to get out of the car and do a little visiting with our friends just beyond the fence.



Scenery like this is to be enjoyed for a long time in my mind's eye.





This little darling looked me straight in the eye and smiled!  





Now that the car park gate has opened we decide to walk on over to visit Townend.  The stone bank barn on the right is extraordinary. 



This barn was built in 1666 by George Browne.  It has extensions that were added in the 18th century.  This barn is still used today for lambing and storing feed for the livestock.






The views over the bank barn show the definition of the stone walls marking the fields.  Oh England, I adore your green pastures!



We reach the bottom and find the lovely garden waiting for us to view. 



Fuchsia grows like shrubbery in the Lake District!  I'm amazed as I'm lucky to grow a basket of this lovely plant.  It appears to be perennial here which I find interesting.



The early fall garden is still blooming.





Troutbeck Valley was a favorite of Beatrix Potter.  She knew the Brownes and visited often.  She owned a farm nearby where she raised her prize winning Herdwick Sheep.





It's time for us to take our tour of the home.  Come inside and do watch your step.  This 400 year old home is quite dark inside.  My photos had to be without flash.





The National Trust takes care of this property and only allows a certain number of guests in at a time.  We have our peg (clothes pin) and are called in for a visit.



There is a table that is spread with goodies that would have been served to guests.



All of the furnishing were carved by George Browne.  Even though they were a simple farming family, Mr. Browne wished to impress his guests.  The family collections are featured which span 400 years!





The ceiling boasts beautiful old cast iron pieces. 



The guide took us upstairs to the very small bedrooms.








As we go downstairs we view a much fancier furnished bedroom.












Off from the parlor was a long table set for a very fancy meal.




There is an extensive library collection at Townend.  A total of 1748 titles are present.  Some dating to the 1600's.  



The beam in the main part of the house has been replaced since our last visit.  The National Trust raised funds to have this replaced.  Thanks to the National Trust, Townend will still be able to greet visitors.





This is George Browne X (1834-1914).  He is responsible for having preserved the many pieces we have viewed.






After leaving Townend we decided to walk over to Annie's Clock.  We had eaten here on our last visit.  It had changed owners since then, but we still had an enjoyable meal.



Next we are off to visit an ancient spot to the north.  I hope you will join us as we show you the window to our trip! ♥

















37 comments:

  1. I love this valley with all the old farms and homes. I am sure this is just what Beatrix Potter had in mind when she left these properties to the National Trust. I thought of her yesterday on her birthday. Thanks for sharing all of your wonderful photographs!

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    1. Chip, you are so right about Beatrix Potter and her wish for conservation and preservation of this gorgeous area! She left an amazing legacy for us to enjoy. Her foresight into the future is astounding. Troutbeck valley is beautiful beyond words. 152 years ago a little child was born that made quite a difference in our world! ♥

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  2. We were not able to get over to Troutbeck so am glad to see your photos. Your header is a beautiful shot over the bank barn! I'd read how much Beatrix loved the Troutbeck valley. Willow Taylor writes in her book that her great-grandfather was the uncle of the last George Browne to live in Townend. She remembers visiting "old Aunt Clara, the last of them, at Townend on many occasions with my mother." She said Beatrix went there regularly, that she and Aunt Clara were the same age and both died in the same year. She said that Beatrix used to tell her mother how she would love to own Townend so she'd be happy to know that the National Trust cares for it now.

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    1. Cathy, I think when you return to the Lake District you would enjoy the many walks that traverse Troutbeck. I've read about Clara Browne and Beatrix enjoying time together. I'm so glad she gave the property to the National Trust. Beatrix probably planted that seed in Clara. ♥

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  3. Ohhh.. I so loved all the things you showed us. I likely will not be able to go there so you've given me a gift to share this with me. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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    1. I'm so glad you are traveling along with us, Teresa. It's fun reliving it with everyone here. ♥

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  4. A place that I have never visited but it is on my list to do so it was a joy to come along with you. What a thrill to have the old beam analysed and get a date, amazing. A great post.

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    1. The National Trust takes such pains to care for places that would be lost forever. What a wonderful organization! It's so interesting to get a look into the past. I do hope you will visit Troutbeck Valley and the Lake District. It's a magical place on earth! ♥

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  5. Very interesting and beautiful! I enjoyed "traveling" along with you.

    Blessings~

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    1. Thank you for traveling with us! It's a joy to share our trip with our friends here. Blessings to you as well. ♥

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  6. Another wonderful visit, full of the charms of a simpler life. I believe I spotted a sugar loaf on the table, set to impress! They say dark brown furniture is {currently} out of style ~ seriously? I'd be more than happy to have any of that furniture in my humble cottage!

    ~~~Waving~~~from Across the Pond~~~Deb in Wales xoxo

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    1. That was a sugar loaf, Deb. Here in the colonies it would have been under lock and key! George Browne's handmade furniture was lovely. He was quite the craftsman. The carved cabinets were my favorite. I love old furniture and really don't like the trend of painting lovely cherry, oak, and mahogany pieces! I'm pretty sure one day in the future folks will be stripping off that white wash. Have a nice evening. ♥

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  7. This post is very dear to my heart Martha Ellen, and I love each photo. It reminds me so much of my home down in Devon. How did you get along driving down those narrow country lanes?

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    1. Oh Denise, I'm so glad you enjoyed the photos. That makes me happy. We visited Devon and Cornwall on the second two weeks of our Golden Anniversary. I hope I do your homeland justice. I love England ---it feels like home to me. My husband did a great job driving while I did a pretty job of trying to be quiet! The single track roads in Devon were the scariest to me! ♥

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  8. Wonderful description and photos. So interesting about the pegs. I guess they keep track of the number of guests that way. I love seeing all the old books on the shelves. Books warm up a room so much--whether from hundreds of years ago, or today!

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    1. Dotsie, Townend is very small and is only open a few days a week. Only two tours a day on the weeks we were there. If you don't get a peg, you don't go on the tour. The book collections were interesting. The lovely leather bound books are priceless. ♥

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  9. I had a wonderful time going through your post. Thanks for sharing them. It seems to be a wonderful place to have a one time visit. Lovely views of Troutbeck Valley. enjoyed all the views of it.
    Lovely made stone barn! Amazing food!
    enjoyed each and everything's inside the building:)

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    1. I'm so glad you enjoyed the visit to Troutbeck Valley and Townend. The area is quite magical. ♥

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  10. So quaint and charming with scenery that could be no other place on earth. The house was dark and “heavy” for lack of a better word. Might be the iron kettles and pots hanging overhead in the kitchen. Obviously, good hooks as well.

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    1. Vee, it's interesting you mentioned the hooks for the cast iron. Just this week I read where one of the kettles fell from the ceiling at Townend! Yikes! The National Trust is working on its repair. I didn't read about an injury, thank goodness. ♥

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  11. I loved this Martha Ellen :)

    Such lovely photos so glad you enjoyed your visit.
    It's always good to see so much authentic History left intact
    for us to learn from and enjoy x

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    1. Fiona, we can thank the National Trust for preserving these special places. They do such a grand job of protecting these places for all to enjoy. ♥

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  12. The scenery is just magical! And it doesn't hurt to dot the landscape with beautiful, smiling sheep. Thanks for the tour. The bed and chairs. Must have been an incredible visit. Hoping to get to the Lake District in 2019 for our own 50th. :-)

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    1. Judy, I can't think of a better place to celebrate your 50th! I hope you will include the Lake District in your itinerary. It is magical! ♥

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  13. Again another great tour! It’s so fascinating how old their structures are in England and nice to know that there are a great many people working to keep them preserved. Did you pet the nose of the sheep that visited you? I know I’d have to try! I couldn’t help but think of the extraordinary labor that everyone had to put out in the kitchens back then. Its a treat to see the old carved wood bed frames and wood work through the home. Until you started sharing your trip I knew nothing about the Lake District.

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    1. Liz, I'm so happy to share the Lake District with you! It's truly a magical place in this world. The darling little sheep did allow me to touch his soft, sweet head. You are right, the work in the kitchens was difficult and dangerous. Imagine women with long skirts around open flame. It's easy to romanticize the past, but certainly there were many dangers. Thank you for coming along with us on our celebration! ♥

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  14. I am trying to find the right words to describe this magnificent place, Martha Ellen! What a wonderful memory making trip, the little Darling indeed gave you a great welcoming smile, what a special treat.
    Thank you for sharing, and thank you so much for your prayers and kind thoughts. I am now at home and all is well.
    Blessings,
    Sue

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    1. Sue, I am so happy to hear you are back home and you are well. Do take care of yourself and take it easy.
      The little Darling was just the sweetest welcoming committee to Townend. Magical moments greeted us around every corner on this trip. Thank you for visiting today. Have a nice weekend. ♥

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    2. I was so interested in the part about B. Potter...I'm really ready to watch that movie again. I love when she bids on land and farms and buys them. But then I got to the books...oh my! That is my passion...old books! What a lovely place to visit! Hugs!

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    3. Thank you, Diane. The books at Townend are amazing and include such old volumes. You would have been in heaven. Of course there are many reasons to believe the Lake District is heaven. ♥

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  15. This reminds me of Agecroft Hall inside some. I love the feeling I have just by looking at the country side.. It's cozy and just warm feeling to me. You and your husband have the sweetest smiles and so enjoying yourselves I can see. Wonderful post and beautiful scenery.
    betsy

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    1. Betsy, we must take the time to visit Agecroft Hall! Thank you for your sweet comments, my friend. ♥

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  16. What an amazing trip, Martha Ellen! Love how the National Trust maintains all these historical structures! I must confess, however, that I'm a bit uneasy with all those cast iron kettles hanging from the ceiling! Together they are quite a heavy load! xoxo Nellie

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    1. Nellie, the National Trust is just wonderful to take such pains to maintain so many properties. I'm so thankful to those so many years ago, including the one and only Beatrix Potter, that had the foresight to save so many properties for posterity!
      Recently one of the heavy kettles fell from the ceiling! There was no mention of an injury, so I assume it happened without incident. Whew! xoxo ♥

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  17. I hope you are alright Martha Ellen.
    Take Care x

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    1. Oh Fiona, I'm just fine. Our family just returned from our annual beach vacation. You are so kind to think of me, sweetie. x ♥

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    2. Happy to hear you are ok Martha Ellen.
      Hope you all had a lovely time x💙

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