Monday, January 28, 2019

Malham Tarn National Reserve and Yorkshire Dales




We spent our first two weeks in the north of England and our second two weeks in the south.  I'll write about that in the weeks to come.  Taking this trip to celebrate our Golden Anniversary was a dream come true.  Today I'd like to take you to Malham Tarn.  Did you know a tarn is a glacial lake?  Malham Tarn is an area in the Yorkshire Dales that provides the most amazing views!  This is the area that inspires all that come to visit.


  
The drive through the Dales is so lovely and pastoral.  Farms, rock walls, and beautiful cattle grazing.



The narrow lanes wind all around the farms as we go higher and higher in elevation.  Thankfully, there are few or no other cars, just the occasional farm vehicle.



Malham Tarn is at the elevation of 375 meters--1230 feet above sea level.  It is England's highest marl lake.  A marl lake is one that has high concentrations of calcium carbonate or lime.  The scenery is beginning to fill with fog in an eerie way.



At every twist and turn we viewed cattle staring back at us.





We finally reach our destination and speak with a lovely woman who guided us to the tarn.  This area is walker's paradise with many, many paths that take you along from one beautiful spot to another.  We wanted to see the glacial tarn so off we go to view the area that has inspired many.



The air is quite chilly at this elevation.  As the wind begins to whip around us, we realize we are in for a cold walk to the tarn.  We failed to remember with the change in elevation there would be a drastic change in temperature!  



It didn't matter to us as we came to visit the tarn that is home to ancient and rare water plants (stoneworts).  Unusual fish make their home here as well.  Malham Tarn is home to the flightless caddis fly.  The only place in the UK where it breeds.  There are many different bird species that occupy this area as well.  I must say that they were all hiding on our cold visit in late September. 





Malham Tarn National Reserve has been managed in partnership with Natural England since 1992.  It encompasses the area around the tarn. 



It was such a cold day when we visited, I'm sure on a warm sunny day this would be a lovely spot to linger.



As we drive out of the car park,  I can't help but stop and admire the sheep that dot the dales.



The belted cattle grazing along the pastures doted our ride throughout the Yorkshire Dales.


Highland cattle stared at us as we made our way along the narrow lanes.


On my next post I want to take you with us as we travel to Studley Royal Water Garden and Fountain's Abbey.  It is our last stop in the Yorkshire Dales and is not to be missed.  Be sure to wear your walking shoes! ♥









37 comments:

  1. The photos even make me feel cold! Too bad you didn't have a warmer/sunnier day. It's like the time we drove up into the Olympic Mountains in Washington state to one of the highest points you could drive to and we couldn't see a thing because we were in the clouds!

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    1. Cathy, this area is will always stick out in my mind. I imagine the winters here must really be something. ♥

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  2. What a beautiful serene place!

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  3. Sometimes I think the bleak weather is the best, somehow the swirling mists and fog lend themselves to the best capture of the atmosphere of certain areas. It's a land where legends are made!

    ~~~waving~~~from Across the Pond~~~Deb in Wales xoxo

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    1. Deb, it's easy to see why Tolkien, Darwin and many others found this area legendary. The ecosystem must be fascinating to observe. I'll have to say the chill in the air went right through us! We're still glad we visited in spite of the chill. xoxo ♥

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  4. I do love these pastoral scenes( super photos) ... Mist and fog conjure up all kinds of stories in my minds' eye .. How delightful to experience rare insects, flowers and birds....I'm loving the tour... Congratulations on your Golden Anniversary.... Big Hugs

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    1. Zaa, the pastoral scenes in Great Britain are certainly legendary. We found the countryside to be so lovely around all of our travels. We are not big city fans and going to Malham Tarn suited us to a T! Thank you for your sweet wishes and comments! ♥

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  5. Ahhh...James Herriot (James Alfred Wight) territory. Do I hear the All Creatures Great and Small theme song? It came to me so readily. I will certainly come along next time wearing my walking shoes.

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    1. Oh yes indeed, Vee. James Herriot country! He surely drove along these same roads to take care of animals at these farms we passed. Such beauty around every curve to take our breath away. ♥

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  6. Look at all the cattle, and those sweet sheep grazing in the grass. They are precious. What a lovely place this is, Martha Ellen, and the rolling hills and views make it spectacular. I love that close-up of the cow. That's a great picture. I wonder what some of the birds are that occupy this area. That's interesting to me, as I love the birds. All the cattle is unique in its own way. No two seem to look alike. : )

    ~Sheri

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    1. Sheri, according to the literature there are all kinds of bird life here at the Reserve. You know I love them as well, but I didn't see any at the tarn. The rolling pastures had many different kinds of cattle in each one. It's a lovely place to visit. I feel very humbled to have been there. ♥

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  7. What an adventure to see that tarn! I read all the Jame's Herriot books and simply adored them. In fact I always remembered his work on a little Cairn Terrier and he said they were sturdy little dogs with little health problems.. which is why I got a Cairn.. and now we have a new one! ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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    1. With a stamp of approval from James Wight's (James Herriot), you have chosen the perfect dog to join your family. ♥

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  8. Beautiful pictures, the animals looked very curious, so glad to see such wide open spaces in England, what a wonderful trip you had!!

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    1. Lynn, the animals were quite curious about us. I think they were hoping we would have something to eat for them. There are miles and miles and miles of open spaces in England that is simply beautiful! ♥

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  9. Martha Ellen, you are such a great guide! You are informative (I always learn something when I am with you) and engaging and you make me feel as if I am on the journey. I felt cold as I visited the tarn with you tonight! I am glad you didn't let the cold deter you . . . what a beautiful sight (even without the birds).

    Oh, those cows. Sweet faces! And the lambs on the dale. I want them all!

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    1. Cheryl, you are so kind, my friend. I'm so glad you came along even though it was a very cold! Next time we'll dress warmly. ♥

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  10. What a wonderful tour you took us on Martha. Those sweet faces of the cattle made me smile.

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    1. I agree with you, Lorraine. The sweet faces of all the animals looking at us was a delight to experience. ♥

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  11. I love cows faces...they look so sweet. Great pics.

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  12. Love all the animals and how serene everything looks :-) Another lovely trip to take for me while reading your blog. Hope you are having a wonderful week.

    Blessings,
    Jill

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    1. I'm so glad you enjoyed this adventure, Jill. It's nice having you join us! ♥

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  13. Oh wow! This is my favorite of all the places you visited. I am going back to take a long slow look at your wonderful pictures, then study this area on maps and Wikipedia. Thanks for sharing your wonderful trip!

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    1. Chip Butter, the Yorkshire Dales are magnificent in their own right. Add to that Malham Tarn and I'm in heaven. The English countryside will forever keep a piece of my heart. I'm so glad you enjoyed it with me. ♥

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  14. That's gorgeous territory, Martha Ellen. I have such a soft spot for cows and sheep! Yorkshire is on my 2020 list at the moment and seeing a post like this does nothing to make me change that!

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  15. What an amazing trip! How did you plan where to go in England? You've seen places that the usual tourist doesn't visit, haven't you? One of our daughters spent first semester of her senior year in college in West Yorkshire at Bretton School of Art. One of these days, I keep hoping that we will make it to England. xo Nellie

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    1. Nellie, each time we have been to England we visited the National Trust and English Heritage sites. We joined them before going over and they sent us our membership cards. The National Trust is the Royal Oak Foundation in the USA. We love the English countryside, so we both look over the places we want to see. Believe me, doing all the work before going is a life safer. I do hope you will go one day, dear Nellie! You should visit the school your daughter attended! xo ♥

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  16. Just the sort of place I like. I hope it was worth braving the cold to bring us these lovely photos.
    Amalia
    xo

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  17. Wonderful series of photos Martha Ellen. I love the one of the cow peaking over the rock wall, and am now looking forward to your next post :)

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    1. Denise, the cow peeking over the wall was so sweet. How could I not take his photo? Thank you for visiting today! ♥

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  18. Martha, I so enjoyed seeing the Dales (and Beatrix Potter sites in the previous post) through your eyes. Such astonishing natural beauty and, of course, the architecture I like. I love armchair travel!

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  19. Lovely James Herriot country …
    A joy to see your photographs, loved the sheep, the cattle and the views.

    All the best Jan

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