Saturday, October 5, 2019

Compton Castle and Primrose Tearoom


As we continue on with our Golden Anniversary trip,  today I'd like to share our next stop on our itinerary,  Compton Castle.  We stayed in Devon and went back and forth into Cornwall as well as further into Devon.  Compton Castle is in Devon.  Come along with us as we explore an interesting medieval fortress that has been the home of the Gilbert family for over 600 years!


It's always interesting to see a vehicle parked in the front of these old castles.  Geoffery and Angela Gilbert and their family make Compton castle their home today. The castle sits on land originally owned by the Compton family.  Joan de Compton married Geoffery Gilbert in 1329.  The Gilberts have been adding on and altering the castle ever since throughout their ownership.


The docent comes to greet us as we walk to the entrance.  Come inside with us as we learn more about the Gilberts and this interesting fortress.


We are invited to watch a video about the history of the castle in the medieval kitchen.  We learn that Sir Humphrey Gilbert was the half brother of Sir Walter Raleigh.  Sir Humphrey Gilbert was an explorer as well as Sir Walter Raleigh.  Gilbert colonized Newfoundland in the name of Queen Elizabeth I in 1583.  Unfortunately Gilbert's ship, The Squirrel, was lost at sea near the Golden Hind, Sir Francis Drakes' ship.  


Squirrels are seen throughout the castle.  The squirrel is on the Gilbert family crest.


Sir Humphrey Gilbert's youngest son, Raleigh, began setting up the Popham Colony in Maine in 1607.  It was such a bitter winter it only lasted a year.


The original manor house was fortified in response to the French raids of the 1520's in Plymouth.  In the 1800's the family moved to Bodmin, Cornwall and Compton Castle fell into ruin and was sold.  Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert bought the castle back in 1931 and renovations were begun.


In 1955 original stonework was found and was used in the Great Hall's windows.


Walking throughout the castle we see lovely gardens.  



The last blooms of Autumn are hanging on the rose bushes.




There is a lovely orchard on the property.  They welcome you to have a picnic here if you'd like.


Beautiful juicy apples hang from these old trees.




The gardens of Compton Castle did not disappoint.  I'm so impressed with the lush beautiful beds full of lovely plants alongside the orchard.  


There is charm around every corner of this lovely spot.  A castle and thatched roof buildings with espaliered plants crawling up the stone wall.  All the elements of fairy tales.


Maybe we would like to play a game of bowling. 




How would you like to join us at the Primrose Tearoom.  It's going to be a bumpy ride, but I assure you you will like the treat when we reach our destination.


Following the advice of our Sat Nav (GPS) we arrive at the tearoom!  I like to stay positive about our travels, but this journey was really something else!  That's enough about that.  Let's go inside.


After touring Compton Castle we were hungry.  Grayden and I  had the mushroom and Gruyere cheese quiche along with the cream tea.  Please pick what you would enjoy and I'll pour for us!



We enjoyed our Cream tea very much.  I hope you enjoyed it as well as our visit to Compton Castle. 


The Primrose Tearoom is in the lovely town of Lustleigh that is not easy to get to, but so worth the travel difficulties.










  


26 comments:

  1. Even living in Great Britain where I am accustomed to old, even ancient, buildings, I still sit in awe that many are still fully functioning family homes. A testament to the builders, and tenacity of the owners' upkeep! Seeing the skittles set up in the middle of a path made me smile!

    ~~~Waving~~~From Across the Pond~~~Deb in Wales xoxo

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    1. Skittles? So that's what that is! I thought it had to do with bowling of some sort, though not in the pattern I'm familiar with. Thanks for the information, Deb! xoxo ♥

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  2. Traveling difficulties? Do tell! It must have been exciting if you are being mum. Was it Grayden’s fault? ��

    I can not imagine living in a home that was inhabited by ancestors for all those years! What a sense of history and place.

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    1. Vee, it wasn't Grayden's fault the Sat Nav took us down a single track road through the winding hill and dale. Hardly a road at all. Gravel and dirt most of the way! We're still here to tell about it, so we're thankful for that! ♥

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  3. I am in awe of these beautiful old stone buildings. But, it's the gardens that I love best!

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    1. The ancient buildings in Great Britain have stood the test of time, Mary. I agree about the gardens. So, so lovely! ♥

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  4. Just lovely, Martha Ellen! I can just feel the peace and quiet while soaking up a bit of history. I'm drawn to the thatched roof building with the espaliered plants on the old walls. It truly brings fairy tales to mind! Difficult journeys often lead to beautiful destinations... and the sweet tearoom was your reward for following Sat Nav without turning back! You and Grayden make a great team!!
    I'm looking forward to catching up on all of your wonderful travels when life slows down a bit, dear friend. So happy that you have a Travel page where I can find all of your posts in order! Tea and travels with you will be oh-so lovely!! Warmest hugs!��

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    1. Dawn, I'm glad you can feel the peace of this particular spot. It was so quiet and dreamlike during our visit.
      It's lovely to have you here this morning, my friend. I do hope all is well with you and your family. xoxo ♥

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  5. Oh how I love to read and view your wonderful memories and images of these historical treasures in England. Just imagine owning and living in a castle like this. I'm so happy the family reclaimed this stone beauty and put the $$ into fixing it up to live in once again. Bravo to them!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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    1. I agree it's amazing the family was able to reclaim a very important part of their history, Teresa! The history that is England is mind boggling. ♥

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  6. What a lovely tearoom. I like all the blue china displayed. These look like raisin scones, Yummy. And with some cream and jelly, they must have tasted so good. The outside of the tea room looks so charming with all the pretty flowers. And the roof is so unusual looking and nice. Another fantastic vacation for you to always remember, Martha Ellen. It's been a long time since I went to a tearoom, but when I did, I had a wonderful experience.

    ~Sheri

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    1. Sheri, you would love this tearoom. The tea and goodies were wonderful. It's so special with its thatched roof. It came right out of a fairy tale in my mind.

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  7. It sounds like that was quite a journey getting to the tea room, but what a beautiful sight to see as you arrived. Loved seeing the blue china, big windows, thatched roof, etc!

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    1. This ride to the Primrose Tearoom has got to be one of the scariest for us, Dotsie. I still remember it with disbelief! But it was so lovely once we arrived.

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  8. Now I need some cream tea. Mushroom and gruyere cheese, my heavens. I need that too.
    I love seeing the gardens and how the plantings are laid out in them. Beautiful post!

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    1. Betsy, you would love the gardens in England. Really aspirational!

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  9. Love that teapot at your cream tea!

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    1. The teapots in this tearoom were so pretty, Ellen. I don't recall the maker of this one, but you can bet it was English. ♥

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  10. This reluctant traveler is shuddering at the thoughts of your rough trip to the tea room! Oh, but the tea room is truly lovely! (Were you tempted to have something a little stronger than tea after your harrowing journey? ~wink~)

    I think that the British people as a rule have a strong sense of history. I think it is wonderful that Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert bought his ancestral home and began to restore it. I remember that there were other places that you visited on your trip that had belonged to one family for hundreds of years.

    (Was the trip back from the tea room any better?)

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    1. Cheryl, we both vowed we would not be leaving on the same road that we came in on! Though the road was longer back to our hotel, it didn't matter one bit to me.
      A good strong tea fortified my soul that day, Cheryl.
      The sense of history is in the air all about Great Britain. It's truly goose bump worthy. ♥

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  11. I would like to visit this well preserved beautiful castle.

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    1. It's a lovely place to visit. Thank you for visiting Compton Castle with me today.

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  12. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed this post of Compton Castle Martha Ellen. I quite often used to walk to the gate of the Castle from my village, quite often with my mother. Compton was the next village to mine, which was called Marldon. I lived there for many years.

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    1. Denise, that is fantastic! You lived in a fairytale land, my friend! How wonderful that you walked to Compton Castle with your mother. That thrills my heart to hear about this. Thank you for telling me! xoxo

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  13. I wanted to check how far it was from my home to the castle. It is 1.2 miles :)

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    1. That is amazing, Denise. We enjoyed our visit there so much. It's lovely to think of you and Compton Castle, my friend.

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