Monday, March 7, 2016

Colonial Williamsburg Gardens in Winter





♫ Music ♫

Most of us are anxious to begin gardening.  When I'm looking for inspiration in my own garden, I like to visit other gardens.  Visiting a garden in the winter can be a great help.  Even though little may be happening, seeing the bones of the garden is helpful.

Even though I do not have the proper amount of sun for a vegetable garden, I enjoy seeing methods used in Colonial Williamsburg.




There is a great vegetable garden on the Duke of Gloucester Street that is maintained by Colonial Williamsburg.  Its officially known as the Colonial Nursery.  You can purchase plants, books and many beautiful items that tempt any gardener.  Let's look around at this vegetable garden in zone 7.




The use of cold frame gardens can help you get a head start on planting.




A cozy filling of straw around the cold frame allows it to be properly insulated.  If you have planted tender plants, you must open these frames while the sun shining on them to avoid cooking your plants.




Cloche jars serve the same purpose, and also needs to be removed as the sun shines on your tender vegetables.














Beside or behind every home is a lovely garden.  I love the design of this one.




Each garden is defined by lovely picket fencing.  Each fence has unique designs.











































The gardening department in Colonial Williamsburg is enormous.  Just knowing how much work goes into my small garden, makes me appreciate the work that goes into these gardens.  Gardening workshops are held in Williamsburg if you are interested in planning your own colonial garden. Tours are popular in spring when Williamsburg is especially beautiful.


"To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow."

Audrey Hepburn



 





30 comments:

  1. I especially like the gardens that use Boxwood as an edging.

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    1. Yes, boxwoods frame a garden with distinction, Cathy. ♥

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  2. It is interesting to see the planning. My little gardens are so nothing by comparison. Just enough to make me happy. I have secretly wished for a certain tree to topple over the winter and not on anyone's head. If I were younger, I'd love a little criss-cross garden with paths to enjoy all the angles.

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    1. Vee, my gardens certainly don't hold a candle to those in Williamsburg. They do give me ideas, though. I have the same problems with too many trees. They are great for hot summer days, but prohibit planting sun loving flowers and veggies. ♥

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  3. Yet more wonderful photos and words, and I especially love the whilber {that's Welsh for wheelbarrow} as I have a thing about them. I love a good, sturdy whilber! Oh, and don't I know all too well about forgetting to open the cold frame when it gets too warm.
    Another sterling choice in music. Toe tapping jovial entertainment and you can just imagine a period social gathering with everyone dancing and enjoying themselves. Sometimes, I think I must have been a colonial lady as I have such an affinity with the music. Well, I can dream, can't I?
    Hugs ~~~Deb xoxo

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    1. Oh Deb, thank you so much for sharing the Welsh word for wheelbarrow---Whilber..that's great! Whilbers are so valuable in the garden. Mine has hauled many things from flowers to rocks to bricks--so many things.
      So glad the colonial music suits your fancy. It's happy music that makes us smile. Have a great afternoon, dear one. xoxo ♥

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  4. The gardens are beautiful there, and like Cathy, I like to see the boxwoods trimming a garden. Partially because their distinct scent brings a pleasant memory from my childhood. I can guess you'd see a difference even in a week at Williamsburg as spring seems to be bursting forth this week here in the south.

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    1. It's funny you mention the fragrance of boxwood, Dotsie. It is quite distinctive! Smells can transport us to another time. There is a boxwood maze behind the Governor's Palace you would enjoy. ♥

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  5. We were there just about a year ago and enjoyed that boxwood maze!! The gardens at Williamsburg are quite an endeavor! - xo Nellie

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    1. Nellie, I'm so glad you have enjoyed the boxwood maze! So much fun for kids and adult kids! xo ♥

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  6. Martha I love the Williamsburg, VA, area! My husband and I would visit it often and we thought we might retire there one day, but of course that dream was before our children and grandchildren brought us out to live in Colorado!

    My older and younger brothers are avid gardeners and both have large vegetable and flower gardens in summer. I always wanted to do the same but when I lived in NYC I did not have land and now that I have land in Colorado I also have deer, rabbits raccoon, and voles, so vegetable gardening is almost impossible--they eat everything. I do grow lots of perenials and found out that the critters don't like lavender so it is my new favorite flower/herb!

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    1. Williamsburg would be a grand place to retire. Of course, where our children live is much better! Your gardens sound lovely and I look forward to seeing that lavender. I don't have adequate sun for it, but I love it!

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  7. Wow I enjoyed seeing all this. I tried to grow boxwoods but they kept getting freezer burn even though I covered them each winter. After a while they looked terrible. Using a cold frame would speed things up around here. It's so interesting how the community works to keep gardens as they would have long ago.

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    1. Liz, I would have no idea how to garden in your zone. You may have an extension agent or master gardener who could help with growing boxwood. Colonial Williamsburg has a large paid staff that takes care of every garden there. ♥

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  8. I needed to see those cold frames. That's why we saved old windows that otherwise would have been discarded. Now to actually do it! It does make a huge difference. I also enjoyed all the fences. I would love to visit there.

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    1. Judy, I hope you can use your old windows for cold frames. I can't wait to see how it works for you! You would love Colonial Williamsburg! ♥

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  9. Martha, that was wonderful, thank you! I am a big believer in garden bones, for without them winter in the garden would be Dulls-ville. Love seeing that rustic arbor, and all the handmade skeps. I was thinking of adding a coldframe to our potager, with some old windows I have on hand; so good to see them here. Love anything you post on Williamsburg.

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    1. Thank you, Jeri. I love seeing your beautiful gardens. I hope you will add a cold frame- giving you a head start on the season. We replaced some 6 foot tall windows last year, but we didn't save them as we felt they were too large for cold frames. ♥

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  10. I love winter garden. There is something brave and hopeful about them.
    Amalia
    xo

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  11. Love the look of the glass "bulbs" which are over plants and protect them.

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    1. Tessa, some folks call the glass bulbs, cloches or bell jars. I love them as well, but they are a little pricey. ♥

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  12. Martha Ellen, I think a garden is such a special place. Mine is very snall, but I love looking out in my back yard and seeing all the different colors of roses. I really like the frames on these gardens to protect them from the cold winter rain and blizzards. And I love Audrey's quote. So very true. :)

    Have a blessed day, Martha Ellen.

    ~Sheri

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    1. I love gardening as well, Sheri. Our weather is just beginning to change to more favorable conditions to really enjoy the garden. I wish I had more sun in which to grow roses, but I do enjoy what I can garden. Enjoy your day, Sheri. ♥

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  13. I love the gardens of colonial Williamsburg. They are so tidy and purposeful, true works of art! Even in the dormant season, they are lovely. The brick walkways, the white picket fences... ~ swoon ~

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    1. The gardens are so peaceful and so well planned, Cheryl. The picket fences frame them so beautifully. ♥

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  14. I so wish I could take lessons on gardening from the pros such as the Williamsburg gang! I adore these photos!!!

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    1. Betsy, wouldn't that be fun? There are seminars we can attend throughout the year. Have a great evening, dear one. ♥

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  15. What a lovely garden. Very well planned out. I love looking at gardens. We have a small vegetable garden, but lots of landscape gardens. Thanks for sharing, from your newest follower.

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    1. Thank you so much for coming by, Linda. I must come by to visit you! Thank you so much for the follow! ♥

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