Thursday, October 29, 2020

Lanhydrock in Cornwall, England

 


How would you like to come with us to one of the special Victorian country homes in Cornwall, England?  We visited this most special place when we were in Great Britain for our 50th anniversary three years ago.  Make sure you have on your walking shoes as this is an enormous property!  The estate takes up 900 acres with miles of footpaths and beautiful woodlands.  If you wish to bring along a picnic this area would be great.


The beautiful parkland that surrounds this property is spectacular on this lovely Autumn afternoon.  We are told that the property is managed organically so the area is a haven for wildlife and a great variety of  wildflowers.



After we walk through the Gatehouse we will continue up the path to the home that once belonged to Thomas Charles, 2nd Lord Robartes, his wife Mary and their ten children.  In 1881 there was a fire that ruined Lanhydrock where his mother Juliana perished.  He inherited the home on the death of his father and had the home rebuilt for his family.


You can see Juliana's portrait in the home as we tour.



And what an enormous home it is!  Let's all go inside and have a look about.  


Notice the lovely woodwork as we walk about the home and the interesting plaster work on the ceilings.


There are over 50 rooms to view here, so we will look at a few of them before taking a look at the property. 





The dining room is set for us to enjoy a meal if you didn't bring your picnic.  Notice the lovely woodwork if you can take your eyes off of the table.


This display is so beautiful with the different flower patterns on the china.





Be sure to read this meaningful ancient prayer that is framed.



Take a look out the windows as you pass by. The views are amazing!

I'm always interested by the kitchens in these large estates.  Of course the staff that ran these homes was huge.  Take a look around with me and imagine all the wonderful meals that were produced here by these hard working men and women.






Are you thinking of Downton Abbey like I am?  Mrs. Patmore would surely be hard at work here.  








There are many rooms to see here, so let's take a look further around.







Remember that the family had ten children.  Their rooms are charming and full of great toys.







There is so much to see here, but we must take a look around the property.  Look out the leaded window!


The gardens were designed by George Truefitt in 1854.  Juliana Agar-Robartes and her head gardener Joseph Bray planned the plants for the extraordinary setting.  The gardens remain the same except for gravel paths dividing the flower beds instead of grass.


 

The 7th Viscount Clifden, Gerald, loved gardening and added camellias, rhododendrons, and Himalayan magnolias to the gardens.  I can just imagine how lovely it would all be in bloom in spring!


The 167 year old Irish Yews that surround the garden and home are expertly maintained. The 29 yews are pruned in July and August.  It takes two weeks to complete the task.  They are fed liquid seaweed fertilizer every 6 to 8 weeks starting in May.  These yews have played a part in the medical world.  Up until recently their bark was sent away to help with cancer research.  The active molecules in the bark improves cell stability. 





St Hydroc has been the patron saint of Lanhydrock's church since a visit in 1478 by William Worcester to the Bodmin priory of St Petroc's. Built in the mid 15th century the church may have incorporated an earlier small church or chapel.  It was remodeled during the 1620's when John Robartes extended Lanhydrock house. The Robartes family crypt lies beneath the old family pews situated to the east end of the south side (nearest the house).

Lanhydrock is maintained by the National Trust and continues to be one of its most visited sites.  I can certainly see why.  I do hope you enjoyed touring this special place with Grayden and I.  We enjoyed reliving it with you!  










 





 


39 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for sharing these places you visited Martha Ellen, many of which I hadn't heard of. I will have a long list thanks to you for when we go back again one day. Hope all is well with you and your family.

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    1. Denise, the National Trust has a special place in our hearts. We love visiting their properties that have been so expertly taken care of. It's nice to join the Royal Oak and you can enter all of their places without having to pay separate entry fees.
      We are well and I hope you and your family are as well. Thank you for stopping by.

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    2. That is such a good tip about the Royal Oak, and I will definitely keep it in mind. Thanks again my friend and enjoy the rest of your week :)

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  2. Thank you for taking us away with you. The National Trust is such a treasure. Hope all is well in your neck of the woods.

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    1. So glad you came along, Ellen. Yes, the National Trust is a treasure! We are doing well and I hope you are.

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  3. Such a wonderful tour you are sharing. So special for your wedding anniversary. I loved seeing the house and gardens. So much to take in. it must have been spectacular to see in person. Thank you for taking us along.

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    1. Linda, we had an amazing adventure celebrating our 50th! Thank you for sharing it with us.

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  4. I love it when you show us these amazing places and the gardens and interiors. I always wonder if the people that lived there appreciated it and were happy. We're here at the coast for a few more days then home to normal. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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    1. Teresa, I would hope that the family that lived in Lanhydrock appreciated their surroundings and hopefully were happy. Have a great time on the coast.

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  5. Martha Ellen, this house is beautiful through and through! The wood panelings are gorgeous, and I am intrigued with the children's rooms and toys. The house must have been full of life with ten children in it. Thank you for always introducing us to new and interesting places!

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    1. Cheryl, there was so much to see and do at Lanhydrock. We didn't want to leave this bucolic setting. I like thinking of the children that lived and played there. As you say, "the house must have been full of life with ten children." It's fun sharing our adventures with you! Thank you.

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  6. Lanhydrock is certainly one of the jewels in the National Trust's crown. I recall how excited my {late} friend and former NT colleague was to visit there during her holiday spent in Cornwall and Devon one year. She certainly put her free employee entry to good use on that summer break, for those counties both have a great deal to offer.

    Stay safe and well! xoxo

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    1. Deb, Lanhydrock was a wonderful surprise for Grayden and I. We are forever grateful to the National Trust for maintaining these wonderful properties. Like your late friend we both were excited to visit all the places we saw in Cornwall and Devon. Even the little small places that the National Trust takes care of thrilled us to no end. Have a cozy, safe weekend! xoxo

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  7. Wonderful Lanhydrock, you’ve captured it so well and comprehensively. We visited it almost every year when we were younger as my mother liked the restaurant there, probably from about 1970 to mid 80s at least. I used to find it a bit dull but as I got older it was much more interesting. When I was 18, my parents gave me a lifetime membership to the National Trust, it’s been so useful. I shall have to go back there for a visit. Thank you for the photos, they really are very good.
    Fiona

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    1. That's so interesting, Fiona. As a child, I think most of us found the places our parents enjoyed boring. Having a lifetime membership to the NT properties is a wonderful gift that keeps on giving. I do hope you are able to go back to Lanhydrock with more mature eyes. Thank you for visiting today and sharing your thoughts.

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  8. What a beautiful estate with a sad history. Do they really allow picnics on the grounds? Interesting and thoughtful. Those yews are remarkable and what a history they have helping with cancer research. Wonder why they stopped. Thank you for telling us more about Lanhydrock.

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    1. Vee, they certainly do allow picnics on the grounds of Lanhydrock. I don't know why they stopped using the Irish yews from Lanhydrock for cancer research. Learning their age was so startling to hear. Take care and have a lovely weekend.

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  9. What a beautiful and large estate! I enjoyed looking at your photos and seeing all the details in each area and room. The kitchen was fascinating as well as the children's toys. It was interesting to learn about the use of yews in medicine. My thought is that whatever compound they had provided has been replicated artificially and is probably cheaper and more available because of that.

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    1. That's a very likely thought about the yews and cancer research, Pat. Thank you for stopping by and giving us insight. I hope you are safe and well.

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  10. Oh Martha Ellen, it is stunning. I love the rooms with the fireplace and the children's room and those ceilings and the wood paneling are exquisite. Isn't that table set beautifully? You had the best trip, didn't you? I love these posts so much!

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    1. Jeanie, this was a trip of a lifetime for Grayden and I. Lanhydrock was certainly spectacular in every way. This trip makes my heart want more. I know you understand. Take care, my friend.

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  11. I've always loved to look at Victorian homes. I used to have Victorian style home décor years ago until I changed it up. The china cabinet is lovely. Look at all those copper appliances in the kitchen. I have grown to love copper. The children's rooms are sweet with all the dolls, games, dollhouse, and special things. Wow, the family had 10 children! It reminds me of my dear mother-in-law who had 10 children. Thanks for sharing the moments of your beautiful time spent in England, Martha Ellen.

    ~Sheri

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    1. Sheri, it was such a lovely estate. Thank you for taking a look with us. Enjoy your week!

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  12. I so enjoyed your visit to this lovely estate! Thanks so much for sharing! 💖

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  13. Hello and happy November to you.
    This was such a lovely post, I enjoyed seeing your fabulous collection of photographs.
    Such a wonderful trip, many thanks for re-living it here.

    My good wishes.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Jan, I'm so glad you enjoyed the photos. Lanhydrock was a wonderful place for us to visit. Happy November to you!

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  14. WOW . . . that place isn't only huge, but it's also beautiful!

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  15. WOW!!! What a splendid trip you have taken us on, ME! Thank you so much! That place sounds absolutely amazing. You did a great job telling us about it. I feel I have been there now! Hugs!

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  16. A joy to read about your trips and love seeing the pictures and history you share. Beautiful place
    Happy Sunday, Betsy

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    1. Betsy, Lanhydrock was really lovely. I'm so glad you came along with me!

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  17. Just stopping by to say - hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thank you Jan, we enjoyed a different but lovely day. Take care and stay safe during this crazy time.

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  18. When you consider how many of these places were demolished in the 1960s for lack of funding for upkeep, it is wonderful that some are still standing and open to the public (which of course helps them be able to stay afloat). Thank you for the tour. I do want to get back to the UK in person, but who knows how long it will be, what with the ongoing covid-19 issue. I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving, Martha Ellen.

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    1. Hi Judy, you are so right about all the huge estates being demolished due to death duties and upkeep. The National Trust is to be commended for their ongoing work with these properties, though I do worry about the affect of the Pandemic on their survival.
      We enjoyed a different Thanksgiving, but still lovely. I hope you did as well!

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